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Important tree planting begins for the Cassowary.

Important tree planting begins for the Cassowary.

January 27, 2019

Cassowaries are the third largest bird in the world and are listed as endangered on the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999). It is estimated only 4,500 remain in the rainforests of the wet tropics in Far North Queensland. Indeed, spotting one in the wild is at the top of many wildlife enthusiast’s lists. Fortunately, the likelihood of seeing one in the Daintree Lowland Rainforest is about to increase due to a collaborative effort involving FAME and Reforest Now.

With thanks to our donors, FAME has been able to support this remarkable project, enabling important feeding habitat restoration. We are pleased to report that already, an astonishing 2,500 trees, of 112 species have now been planted at Cow Bay. This will help to restore more of the tropical breeding habitat for the Cassowary. As the trees become established Cassowaries are expected to again start using the area. Project planting by Reforest Now is set to continue, with the aim of reaching 5,000 trees planted in total.

The conservation value of the Daintree Lowlands are unparalleled. Examples from the Wet Tropics Management authority make startling claims on the region’s biodiversity.

  • 40% of Australia’s bird species
  • 58% of Australia’s bat species
  • 30% of Australia’s mammal species
  • 60% of Australia’s butterfly species
  • 21% of Australia’s reptile species
  • 21% of Australia’s cycad species
  • 29% of Australia’s frog species
  • 65% of Australia’s fern species
  • 30% of Australia’s orchid species

While we enjoy reporting successful project outcomes to you, we still need your help.

Through the generosity of our supporters, we are contributing $50,000 to establish 5,000 trees before June 2019. Every $10 donated will enable us to plant and maintain one tree until it’s established. So far we’ve raised $7,275 so we urgently need another $42,725 to reach our goal. Please, make a donation now to help expand habitat for the endangered Cassowary.